NutJack Side-bets

 

By Marty Wollner

 

mailto:mwollner@mi.rr.com

SpikerSystems.com

 

29-Aug-2015 (l)

 

 

 

 

HTML:

http://spikersystems.com/FlashNet_Pointer/www/projects/SpikerSystems/eGamers/Documents/NutJack.htm

 

MS-WORD:

http://spikersystems.com/FlashNet_Pointer/www/projects/SpikerSystems/eGamers/Documents/NutJack.doc

 

 

 

Popular jackpots in poker today include “Bad-Beat’, “Quad-Aces”, “Royal flush suite of the day”, etc.

 

NutJack is a new side-bet jackpot wager from SpikerSystems, L.L.C., to be used in poker games for winning “NUT HAND” Jackpots.

 


 

 

Quick description:

 

In a live game of no-limit Texas-hold-em poker, players can make a side-bet that the hand there’re playing is “unbeatable”… “the nuts”. They can make the side-bet either at ante for $5, or after they see their hole cards at pre-flop for $10, or after they see the flop for $25. If they don’t have “the nuts” at the showdown, the money is accumulated into the “NutJack Jackpot” (i.e., a plastic box on the table). If they do have “the nuts”, they win the jackpot.

 

NutJack side-bet wagers are unique for two reasons:

 

1)      Players holding nut hands can totally control the jackpot… they can wait until they see the flop (when they already know they have an unbeatable hand) and then bet on it to win an accumulated jackpot.

 

2)      At the pre-flop or the flop (or even later, in some versions of NutJack), the act of making the side-bet may be used as “a sanctioned way” of showing hand strength, or as a bluff. Thus, NutJack side-bets can affect the action of the live game itself.

 


 

 

So, first question: WHAT IS A “NUT HAND” ???

 

Here is the Wikipedia Definition of a nut hand:

In poker, the nut hand is the strongest possible hand in a given situation. The second-nut hand or third-nut hand (and so on) may refer to the second and third best possible hands. The term applies mostly to community card poker games where the individual holding the strongest possible hand, with the given board of community cards, is capable of knowing that they have the nut hand.

In Texas hold 'em, if the board is 5♠ 6♠ A♣ 9♠ 5♥, a player holding 7♠ 8♠ has the nut hand, a 9-high straight flush of spades, and cannot lose. On the same board, the hand 5♣ 5♦ would be the second-nut hand, four of a kind fives; the third-nut hand would be any pair of the remaining three aces, making a full house, aces full of fives.

It is important to note that the actual nut hand may not be the same as the absolute nut hand; for example, if the board is 7♥ 2♣ K♠ K♥ 3♦ a player with K♣ K♦ has the absolute nut hand. However, any player with K-7 knows that he has the nut hand as it is impossible for another player to have two kings. The phrase may also refer to a hand in progress with cards yet to be dealt, as the player can be said to have the nuts at that time. For example if a player holds 7♠ 8♠ on a board of 5♣ 6♠ 9♥ he can be said to have the nuts, however if the next card comes 7♥ then 8-10 becomes the nuts. This makes some nut hands very vulnerable in nine-card games, such as Omaha hold 'em.


 

 

Please note that:

 

This is real terminology, accepted by the industry, for example, HERE is another source that uses this same terminology.

”Nut Hand”, “The nuts”, “He has the nuts” is no joke, and “NutJack side-bet” is an appropriate name for our new wager. SERIOUSLY!

 

 

More terminology:

 

As described by Wikipedia (above), nut hands can be either “ABSOLUTE” or they can be “ACTUAL”. For our purposes, we are dealing with “reality” (in that our use of these hands occurs in real live poker games being played). And thus, we will only use the “ACTUAL” definition of nut hands, when we identify them as being “The Nuts”.

 

 

“Actual” nut hands may be either:

 

 

or

 

 

In non-exclusive nut scenarios, more than one player can win the hand, and the jackpot may be divvied among the winners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Now that you’re an expert on nut hands, here are some nice features of NutJack side-bets:

 

·        NutJack side-bets are simple for the dealer to implement, and simple enough for even novice players to fully understand… you can make a side-bet that you have a “nut hand”.

 

·        NutJack side-bets can be used in many games of poker ranging from 5-Card Stud to Texas Hold-Em, and for both limit and no-limit games, as well.

 

·        The procedures and table-actions are simple enough for the dealer to be able to EASILY perform them without any electronics, nor require any special training beyond typical poker dealer proficiency.

 

·        The additional processing time to accommodate NutJack side-bets is very minimal… all of the procedures and table actions are very quick; the NutJack side-bet will not significantly impact overall hands-per-hour cycle time.

 

·        The NutJack side-bet can easily be integrated into existing electronic jackpot systems and retrofitted into live electronic gaming procedures as well.

 

·        NutJack side-bets can be closely integrated into the game being played; the hidden beauty of NutJack side-bets is the way they can be used to enhance the gaming strategies employed in the live poker game being played, in ways that have never before been attempted!

 

 


 

 

How the NutJack side-bet works in CASINO poker rooms -

 

In most of the variations of the live game of poker, a series of wagers are made as the cards are dealt. For example, in the game of Texas Hold-em, “ante”, “pre-flop”, “flop”, “turn” and “river” bets are made, in sequence, as the live game progresses.

 

A player can optionally make the NutJack side-bet when live-game wagers are allowed. Unlike the live-game bets, which get pooled into the table pot, a separate pot accumulates the NutJack side-bets, and the accumulation can span over multiple hands at the table.

 

In casinos that support electronic gamming, the NutJack jackpot can be accumulated from multiple tables, like the way they already do it for “Bad-Beat”, “Royal-Flush”, etc. jackpot pools. The NutJack side-bet is really no different from already existing house jackpots like these. Most of the table procedures to implement NutJack side-bet jackpots are already in place in most casinos and already familiar to most players.

 

 

 

Special situation… handling accidental card exposures:

 

As pointed out by DJTeadyBear on the WoV forum, if a card(s) is (are) accidentally exposed over the course of a hand, this can affect whether a hand is considered “the nuts” or not. In these special situations:

 

  1. Once a card is accidentally exposed, players are no longer allowed to make NutJack side-bets.

 

  1. If any NutJack side-bets have already made before accidental exposure, then the cards that become exposed are not allowed to be considered for determination of the hand’s status as an actual nut hand.

    In other words, we act like it never happened.

 


 

Manual game procedure for NutJack side-bet:

 

In more primitive casinos, or at home, a clear plastic collection box on the table, in front of the dealer accumulates cash and/or chips. This is identical to boxes used today to rake in-house jackpot collections, like “Bad-Beat” or to hold dealer tips.

 

Additionally, on the table layout, in front of the box, an “enqueueing region” is marked out to indicate which players are making in-progress NutJack side-bets, similar to the “Fire-Bet” layout used in the game of craps.

 

For example:

 

 

NutJack by SpikerSystems, L.L.C. Jackpot:

 

$480

 

 

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9       <- Enqueueing region player#

  -  $10  -   -  $10  -   -  $10  -       <- Enqueueing region wager

 

 

It is envisioned that the NutJack side-bet has a set cost, for example $10. In this example, players in seats 2, 5, and 8 have made the NutJack side-bet, and there is $480 of previously accumulated jackpot money in the square collection box.

 

NutJack is the first poker game side-bet to use a by-player side-betting spot-field, as far as I know.


 

Overhead of employing the NutJack side-bet:

 

Dealers who deal the game of Omaha must be able to identify “High” and “Low” hands, and these skills are identical to those needed to be able to identify nut hands. Dealers in casinos that have jackpots (like the “Bad Beat”) ALREADY NEED TO PERFORM THIS EXACT CHECK for jackpot winners … the procedures are not changed; this is simply another type of jackpot to check for, like having to check for “4 aces”, “Royal flush suite of the day”, etc.

 

Please see the sections below explaining commissions and rakes. Even when rakes and commissions are processed, and even in non-electronic implementations, the NutJack side-bet does not add an unreasonable amount of extra work for the dealers.

 


 

 

PLAYERS - Making the NutJack side-bet:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

·        If the player folds his hand before the final disposition, he does not collect anything… the money is lost to the pool.

 


 

 

DEALERS - Determination of NutJack side-bets:

 

Upon the final disposition of a hand, if a player has made the NutJack side-bet and he has the “exclusive nut” hand, he wins the entire NutJack accumulation. Simple, yes?

 

The dealer only needs to accept NutJack side-bets as they’re are wagered (as part of the live game’s wagering phases) and then, in the final disposition of the hand, he makes the determinations of who wins the hand (as usual). And now, he also needs to check if the winners are nut hands (easily accomplished), and if so, check if they’ve made the NutJack side-bet or not: if so, pay it off; it is all VERY SIMPLE.

 

For example:

 

 

NutJack by SpikerSystems, L.L.C. Jackpot:

 

$480

 

 

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9       <- Enqueueing region player#

  -  $10  -   -  $10  -   -  $10  -       <- Enqueueing region wager

 

Upon final disposition, let’s say the board is QUAD NINES: 9c 9d 9h 9s 3c, player 2 has Kh Jd, player 5 has Jc Jh, and player 8 has Ad Js.

 

Player 8 has won the exclusive jackpot as 9c 9d 9h 9s Ad. He gets the $480 plus the $30 in the enqueueing region, for a total of $510 (plus the table pot, of course). The next hand immediately begins with the jackpot value of zero.

 


 

 

The NutJack jackpot pool can accumulate money AFTER the hand ends by:

 

 

 

This happens when no nut hands are won for any NutJack side-bets. SIMPLE!!! In this case, the dealer simply moves all of the money from the enqueueing region, into the jackpot accumulation box and then deals the next hand. This table action is much faster and simpler than clearing off a roulette layout; it should take about two seconds, at best.

 

For example:

 

 

NutJack by SpikerSystems, L.L.C. Jackpot:

 

$480

 

 

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9       <- Enqueueing region player#

  -  $10  -   -  $10  -   -   -   -       <- Enqueueing region wager

 

Let’s say the board is: 9c 9d 9h 9s 3c, player 2 has Kh Jd, player 5 has Jc Jh, and player 8 has Ad Js… the nut, yes, but he didn’t make a NutJack side-bet!

 

Player 8 has won the table, but he had nothing to do with the NutJack side-betting that was going on. He gets paid the table pot, of course. Players 2 and 5 did make NutJack side-bets, but they lost ‘em. The dealer moves the $20 from the enqueueing region, into the jackpot box, bumping the total to $500, and then he deals the next hand.


 

All players folding to a player that has made a NutJack side bet:

 

In this unique scenario, the dealer must go ahead and deal out the hand in order to know if the player hit his nut hand or not.  This takes extra time for the dealer to perform and it impacts the hands-per-hour cycle time, yes, however:

 

·        This should not happen very often, like perhaps one out of 25 hands, depending on the variation being played (described below).

 

·        It should only take a few seconds to perform.

 

·        It has the “side-effect” of allowing players to BUY a look at the cards… for the set cost ($10) you get to see the hand dealt all the way out!


 

 

Variations of NutJack side-bets:

 

 

“Free NutJack”

 

This extremely simple variation is played as just another house jackpot, like “Royal Flush suite of the day”. There are no NutJack side-bet wagers in this variation; the jackpot is seeded by money raked from the live-game pots, as described below.

 

If the player has the exclusive nut-flush, he wins the jackpot accumulation, just like “Royal Flush suite of the day”. It is VERY SIMPLE!!!

 

This variation does not require the enqueueing region, and players don’t really need to learn anything about it.

 

 

“Free, Shared-Win NutJack”

 

This is a slight variation to “Free NutJack”, wherein multiple players can split a jackpot if they share a non-exclusive nut-hand.

 

 

 

 

Obviously, Free NutJack and Free, Shared-Win NutJack do not allow the user to affect the live game, which is the real beauty of the NutJack side-bet wager. All of the following variations do allow the user to affect the live game, because the player is involved in the decision-making…

 

 


 

“Shared-Win NutJack”

 

In this basic, no-frills variation of NutJack, players can win non-exclusive jackpots; if there is a shared win scenario, then the entire accumulation is shared evenly amongst them.

 

For example:

 

Shared-WIN

NutJack by SpikerSystems, L.L.C. Jackpot:

 

$480

 

 

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9       <- Enqueueing region player#

  -  $10  -   -  $10  -   -  $10  -       <- Enqueueing region wager

 

 

Let’s say the board is: 9c 9d 9h 9s 3c, player 2 has Ah Kd, player 5 has Jc Jh, and player 8 has Ad Ac.

 

Players 2 and 8 both have won the (non-exclusive) shared jackpot. Each gets ˝ of the $480 plus ˝ of the $30 in the enqueueing region, for a total of ($240 + $15) = $255 each.

 

Dealers already have the skills to perform this task… it is simpler that having to divvy up a table pot split amongst more than one winner.

 

Of course, players 2 and 8 also split the table pot as well.


 

 

“Exclusive-WIN NutJack”

 

In another “basic, simple variation of NutJack”, if more than one share a “non-exclusive” jackpot, then NEITHER PLAYER WINS the jackpot, however, their set-cost is returned to them from the enqueueing region.

 

For example:

 

Shared NO-WIN

NutJack by SpikerSystems, L.L.C. Jackpot:

 

$480

 

 

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9       <- Enqueueing region player#

  -  $10  -   -  $10  -   -  $10  -       <- Enqueueing region wager

 

Let’s say the board is: 9c 9d 9h 9s 3c, player 2 has Ah Kd, player 5 has Jc Jh, and player 8 has Ad Ac.

 

Players 2 and 8 have both “hit” the shared non-exclusive nut hand, and so NEITHER wins the NutJack jackpot! As a consolation prize, each gets his set amount back, so player 2 gets $10 back, and player 8 gets $10 back. The dealer then moves the remainder of the enqueueing region (the $10 lost by player 5) back into the jackpot box, bumping the total to $490, and deals the next hand.

 

Note that players 2 and 8 split the table pot, as expected.

 

The underlying purpose of losing shared non-exclusive nut hands is to prolong the time in-between and further accumulate the jackpot… to make it last longer and pay off bigger.

 

 

 

 


“First-Nut NutJack”

 

In this variation of “Shared-Win NutJack”, the FIRST PLAYER to make a NutJack side-bet in a given hand can win a larger portion of non-exclusive, shared jackpots; this player’s set-amount bet is positioned separately from the other players in the enqueueing region (see FIRST WAGER, below) so as to indicate who made the first NutJack side-bet.

 

If other player(s) do make a subsequent NutJack side-bet, and if there is a shared win scenario, then the jackpot accumulation is shared evenly among them (like in “Shared-Win NutJack”), HOWEVER, all of the set-amount bets are won by the player who made the first-NutJack wager.

 

For example:

 

First-Nut

NutJack by SpikerSystems, L.L.C. Jackpot:

 

$480

 

 

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   <- Enqueueing region player#

  -   -   -   -  $10  -   -  $10  -   <- Enqueueing region wager

  -  $10  -   -   -   -   -   -   -   <- Enqueueing region FIRST WAGER

 

Let’s say that upon final disposition, the board is: 9c 9d 9h 9s 3c, player 2 has Ah Kd, player 5 has Jc Jh, and player 8 has Ad Ac.

 

Let’s also say that player 2 had made his NutJack side-bet on the turn, when he realized the he had the nut in any case, no matter what (** see the discussion below about this capability and “player control”). Let’s say that he was the first to make this bet because of his seat position when the turn transpired, and that players 5 and 8 made their respective NutJack side-bets sometime afterwards.

 

As shown above, the dealer positions the bet in the enqueueing region’s FIRST WAGER spot for player #2 when it is made. He positions the bets for players 5 and 8 into their respective WAGER spots as they’re made, as well.

 

Players 2 and 8 both have won the (non-exclusive) shared jackpot. Each gets ˝ of the $480. In addition, player 2 gets all of the money in the enqueueing region, as a bonus because he was the first player in the hand to make a NutJack side-bet. So player 2 gets ($240 + $30) = $270, player 8 gets $240, and of course, players 2 and 8 split the table pot as well.


 

 

Note that if the “First Wager” player’s hand is not the winner, then the hand is treated as a “Shared-WIN NutJack”.

 

The underlying purpose of paying bonus money for making the first NutJack side-bet is to encourage NutJack side-bets to be made.

 


 

“All-In NutJack”

 

In this variation, used only for no-limit games, a player must go “All-In” when he makes his NutJack wager… the set-amount is placed into the enqueueing region, and the rest of his stack is added to the live game pot.

 

The player must say “NutJack-All-In”… he cannot say “All-in” and then make the NutJack side-bet, and he cannot say Nut-Jack” and then all-in, as this would amount to making a string bet.

 


 

 

“All-In, First-Nut NutJack”

 

Another variation would combine “First-NutJack” with “All-In NutJack” wherein the first player to make the “All-In NutJack” bet becomes the “First Player” of  “First-Nut NutJack”. In this case, NutJack side-bets are allowed without having to go all-in, but then by going all-in, a player can supercede a previously established ”First-Player” status.

For example:

 

All-In, First-Nut

NutJack by SpikerSystems, L.L.C. Jackpot:

 

$480

 

 

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   <- Enqueueing region player#

  -   -   -   -  $10  -   -   -   -   <- Enqueueing region wager

  -  $10  -   -   -   -   -   -   -   <- Enqueueing region FIRST WAGER

 

FOLLOWING THE (previous) EXAMPLE OF “First-NutJack”, let’s say that this is the state of the game after the turn:

 

 

 

Now, on the river, let’s say that player 8 decides to go all-in and he makes the NutJack side-bet at the same time (boasting his hand strength, btw). This changes the state:

 

All-In, First-Nut

NutJack by SpikerSystems, L.L.C. Jackpot:

 

$480

 

 

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   <- Enqueueing region player#

  -  $10  -   -  $10  -   -   -   -   <- Enqueueing region wager

  -   -   -   -   -   -   -  $10  -   <- Enqueueing region FIRST WAGER

 

Player 8 now becomes the FIRST PLAYER because he was the first player to go all-in, and that supercedes player 2, who had made the FIRST NutJack bet, but it wasn’t the first ALL-IN NutJack bet.

 

Note that if a player 2 had made his first NutJack bet an All-In NutJack, he would’ve immediately locked “FIRST PLAYER” status, and player 8’s All-in NutJack bet would not have made him “First player”.

 

Let’s say that upon final disposition, the board is: 9c 9d 9h 9s 3c, player 2 has Ah Kd, player 5 has Jc Jh, and player 8 has Ad Ac.

 

Players 2 and 8 share the $480 jackpot, player 8 gets the $30 form the enqueueing region, and of course, players 2 and 8 split the live-game table pot.

 

 

I suppose it would be all right for a player to upgrade his own status as well by going all-in subsequent to making a NutJack side-bet… maybe he has to pay the set amount again, or maybe ˝ of it… there’s a lot of flexibility in the rules, and yet, the concepts are very simple to understand for everyone involved.

 

Limiting when players can make the NutJack side-bet:

 

If players are restricted to only making NutJack side-bets in the “Ante” phase, this makes the wager very much a “craps-shoot” as the pure chance of the player obtaining a nut hand are very slim, as can be gleaned from this chart of pre-flop hands that result in a nut hand:

 

https://caniwin.com/poker/texas-holdem/pre-flop/nut-odds/

 

By allowing the NutJack side-bets to be made later on in the sequence, the house is basically allowing players to jump upon opportunities that arise… THAT IS WHAT POKER IS ALL ABOUT… playing the hand that you’re dealt:

 

 

 

 

 

As a result of this, if the NutJack side-bet is allowed in later phases of the betting sequence, the accumulation pool is more likely to be depleted sooner than later; because the players can fully control it, it becomes a simple matter of time until someone gets a nut hand.

 

For example, in Texas Hold-em, about 1 hand in 100 is an exclusive nut hand, so in a game with 9 players, an exclusive nut hand should occur on average, every 11 hands played at the table. Non-exclusive nut hands happen way more often than that… I would guess every fourth table hand has some kind of nut hand (if they were all played to the river, that is).


 

The true beauty of the NutJack side-bet- it’s a POKER thing:

 

 

In review, if the NutJack side-bet is allowed in later phases of the betting sequence, the players can more fully control the disposition of the jackpot. In games like these, the jackpots don’t stay around too long.

 

The NutJack side-bet thus allows players to act upon the outcomes, AFTER the fact!

 

There aren’t a lot of bets in the casino like that at all… Blackjack also does allow you to make decisions as the game is played. But the granddaddy of games in which the player can exert control is POKER… hands down!

 

The hidden beauty of the NutJack side-bet is what happens when this scenario is played out… the side-bet jackpot becomes a part of the live game itself.

 


 

Commissions:

 

In casinos, there should be a small commission for these bets, for example, $11 buys you a $10 NutJack side-bet… the dealer takes $1 from these bets as the wager is made, and keeps it as house profit. I suppose they would store these profits into a separate collection box, (like the kind I’m always crashing my knee into, under the table), so they can maintain the table balances exactly.

 

Alternatively, the commission can be taken at jackpot payout… that is a bit less profitable but easier to implement.

 

The NutJack side-bet may also be offered as a benefit in a customer rewards program.

 

The NutJack side-bet commission can be obtained from a rake, as described below.

 

Or, no commission for the side bets, make up for it in increased table traffic because this side-bet is COOL and it costs next to nothing to implement it a casino poker game.

 

Rakes:

 

A rake is something that is always taken, for examples, the house rake of the table pot. and the rakes taken for jackpots, like “Bad-Beat”. Again, the procedures are NOT CHANGED for collecting rakes for NutJack side-bets, in a casino that already collects rakes for existing jackpots.

 

Rakes can be used as commissions to pay for the overhead of employing NutJack side-bets. Rakes can also be used to seed the NutJack jackpot.

 

As described above, NutJack side-bets have many variations on the way it can be played. In some, it might be necessary to have a rake in order to seed the NutJack side-bet jackpot (i.e., no sane players would make the bet with an empty jackpot). In this case, so be it; casinos do this right now with existing jackpots… the players must pay for these rakes, like it or not.

 

Perhaps big casinos should offer poker tables that allow a choice of which jackpots they’d be playing for, and in this case, advanced players who want to use the NutJack side-bet in their playing strategies could elect to do so.

 

If a rake of the main pot is used to seed the NutJack side-bet accumulation, the “manual procedure” would have the dealer putting the rake directly into the plastic box as he takes it, identical to the way he puts it into existing house jackpot boxes.

 


 
Discussion:

 

 

The NutJack side-bets can add excitement and variability to an otherwise boring game of poker. This is especially true for fixed bet games. However, even seasoned pros of no-limit Texas hold-em games desire betting pools (like bad-beat jackpots)… that’s why they have them, like everywhere these days.

 

NutJack, however, is more integrated into the live game that these generalized betting pools… NutJack can become an integral part of the live game strategy, itself!

 

Although the NutJack side-bets do not directly affect the game (other than to change player stack-sizes by fixed amounts), when a player makes a NutJack side-bet, it is a clear signal to everyone else at the table that the player believes he has a great hand… so much so, that he is willing to bet on it. So if the bet is made, he has to have a great hand (or his money is lost to the side bet accumulation)… either that or he’s using the bet to show his strength, but it might be a bluff as well!

 

Players can thus use this activity to sway the live-game decisions made by other players!

 

If you stop and think about it for a minute, you realize that:

 

NutJack side-bets are an “officially sanctioned” way of adding more credibility to your hand!

In my opinion, this is far better than pausing the game, starring down your opponent, playing with your chips, asking questions, or ANY of the tactics used by players to impart an impression of hand strength.

THIS IS A NEW WAY TO PLAY POKER!

 

 

This is true, more so in NutJack variations that don’t accumulate over-time; the bet pool itself becomes an important part of the game strategy. As described above, these are the variations that allow the bet to be made in the later phases of the betting sequence.

 


Recommendations:

 

Even in the variations that pool the jackpot over longer periods of time, the act of making the NutJack side-bet still carries implications, and it should be a ton o’ fun in any case for everyone to explore all of the possibilities; I think players are really going to enjoy incorporating it into their poker strategies.

 

I would recommend to a casino (this is scaled upon a $50 - $100 buy-in game of Texas hold-em):

 

1) “WoV NutJack for limit Texas Hold-em”

 

“First-Nut NutJack”, $5 bet at ante, $10 at pre-flop, all bets using a $1 commission, paid up-front, or a 10% commission upon jackpot payout.


This variation would be better for casinos that can’t pool money into jackpots from multiple tables. These jackpots would have little accumulation, however, the NutJack side-bet will be effective in the live-game strategy.

 

 

2) “WoV NutJack for no-limit Texas Hold-em”

 

“All-In, First-Nut NutJack”, $5 bet at ante, $10 at pre-flop, $25 at the flop, all bets using a $1 commission, paid up-front, or a 10% commission upon jackpot payout.


This variation would be better for casinos that can’t pool money into jackpots from multiple tables. These jackpots would have little accumulation, however, the NutJack side-bet will be MOST effective in the live-game strategy.

 

 

3) “INSANE NutJack for no-limit Texas Hold-em”

 

“All-In, First-Nut NutJack”, $5 bet at ante, $10 at pre-flop, $25 at the flop, $100 at the turn, all bets using a $1 commission, paid up-front, or a 10% commission upon jackpot payout.


This variation would be better for casinos that can’t pool money into jackpots from multiple tables. These jackpots would have little accumulation, however, the NutJack side-bet will be INSANELY effective in the live-game strategy.

 


 

4) “NutJack for limit Texas Hold’em, 5-card draw or 5-card stud”

 

“First-Nut NutJack”, $10 set bet, using a $1 commission paid up-front, or a 10% commission upon jackpot payout, allowing the bet to be made upon ante or pre-flop or flop.

This variation would be better for casinos that can’t pool money into jackpots from multiple tables. These jackpots would have little accumulation, however, the NutJack side-bet will be effective in the live-game strategy.

 

Or

 

“First-Nut NutJack”, $10 set bet, using a $1 rake from every pot > $20 to seed the jackpot until it reaches $50, a 10% commission on all jackpots kept by the house, allowing the bet to be made upon ante or pre-flop.

This variation would be better for casinos that can pool money from multiple tables into the NutJack side-bet jackpot accumulation. These jackpots would have moderate accumulation, and the NutJack side-bet would still have a moderate effect upon the live-game strategy.

 

Or

 

“Free NutJack”, NO set bet, using a $1 rake from every pot > $20 to seed the jackpot. If you have the exclusive nut hand, you win the jackpot, just like “Royal flush suite of the day”.

This variation would also be better for casinos that can pool money from multiple tables into the NutJack side-bet jackpot accumulation. These jackpots would accumulate the most, but have very little effect upon the live-game strategy.

 

 

5) For a home game of no-limit Texas hold-em:

 

“All-In, First-Nut NutJack”, $10 set bet, no commission, allowing the bet to be made upon pre-flop, flop, and turn.

 

This variation would have a crazy impact on the live-game strategy.

 

 

 

Thoughts and comments are welcome.

 

Marty – 29-Aug-2015